Humpday Links for January 25

Happy Robert Burns Day!  While you wait for your haggis to cook I hope you’ll enjoy these wee timorous links…

– It is time once again for Paizo’s RPG Superstar Challenge, and the 32 competitors have been chosen!

– I’ve long suspected that Mark Wahlberg is America’s secret weapon…now I know for sure.

– Nothing I could say would equal the awesomeness of this, so presented without comment: the crowd-sourced fan film version of Star Wars: A New Hope.

– From The Mary Sue: This may just take the top spot as coolest engagement ring/proposal combo ever.

Dave Hewlett has a new web series and you should watch it.  Watch it hard!

– Apparently, scientists have been taking awesome pictures of space again.  Warning: this image is really big, so give it time to load. You won’t be sorry.

A side-by-side comparison of an average woman (plus-size model Katya Zharkova) and a “super” model.  Fascinating.

“A Wrinkle in Time” is turning 50.  Time to give it another read, methinks.

How did I not know about this Due South convention!?  How!?

– Courtesy of The Joe Shuster Awards, here is a pretty comprehensive list of current Canadian webcomics.  I…I might be away for a while…

Robin D. Laws has some advice for avoiding an outbreak of Foot-in-Mouth disease the next time you talk to your favourite creator.

– As a writer, I need to take much of the advice on this list.  Maybe you do as well.

– It has been said that Mal Reynolds is the Han Solo of a new generation; this shirt proves it.

– We’ve touched on ridiculous female “armour” before, but this article actually examines some of the issues faced in properly armouring women.

– A bit behind the curve, but in case you missed it Hasbro has been hit by sweatshop allegations.  What price, Transformer?

– Courtesy of GeekDad, his picks for Top 5 RPGs of 2011.  I agree with them all, and I’m glad to see Microscope made the Honourable Mentions list.

A very good interview with James L. Sutter on writing and RPGs, courtesy of SF Signal.

– And finally, if you are starting any kids out with 4th Ed D&D, I highly recommend these character sheets.

Okay, your haggis should be done by now; time to eat!  Join me tomorrow for more nerdery, and please do share any of your own links in the comments.

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Play Does Not Discriminate

As I’m preparing for this holiday season, I am of course pondering gifts for my four nephews.  One sister has started a family board game night tradition, which evoked from me a window-rattling “squeee” of joy.  I would never try to force my hobbies on the boys, but I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t perched like a buzzard on a rock, waiting for the first sign of geekness.  Oh, children, the worlds your Uncle Brent will share with you now…

But we can talk about the corruption mentoring of my nephews another time.  Searching for games and toys for the nephews inevitably got me thinking, in an abstract way, about gender identity and play.  Because during my search I had a stray thought that went something along the lines of, “Well, they’re all boys so this will be easy.”  And it pinged as a vaguely bad thought in my head, but being a stray thought I caged it to be pondered later, perhaps in the wee hours of some cold morning over a cup of coffee.

Then yesterday I was reading through the Twitters when a message from my pal Alina Pete (of Weregeek fame #humblebrag) popped up:

In fact, Lego was one of my favorite toys, & I didn’t need nor want no stinkin’ Polly Pocket look alike *frothfoamrant*…

Included in the message was a link to this GeekDad article over at Wired, about the new Lego Friends line targeted at girls.  Take a second to read it, and then come back… Excellent, moving on!  Now normally I might have read the article and dismissed it with a casual, “Oh, Lego, why?”.  But the article, coupled with Alina’s reaction to it, set that stray thought to barking up a storm.  So much so I pulled it out last night and gave it a good pondering.  And the undeniable truth of it is my stray thought is the reason Lego thinks this is a good idea.

No, I don’t mean Lego is reading my mind.  But Lego is certainly trying to read the minds of consumers; that’s sort of what market research and testing are for.  And thousands upon thousands of stray thoughts just like mine have led Lego, and several other toy and game companies, to the same conclusion: that toys and games, and therefore play, should be divided along gender lines.

And I for one want to call bullshit.

Play does not discriminate.  Unless the idea is imposed externally, the activities from which a child derives joy are never gender divided by children.  I know this from my own experience.  When I was five-years-old I had a small collection of the 12″ GI Joes; a couple of the dolls, some clothing sets and a vehicle or two.  But I played the hell out of those toys, because there wasn’t a lot to do in a mining town in northern Manitoba.  One day I was playing with my Joes in the sandbox, when I was joined by a few girls of varying ages around my own, laden down with a tonne of Barbies and Barbie accessories.  I couldn’t tell you their names now, but as there were only about 30 kids in all of South Bay we knew each other from around the playground, Sunday school and the like.  So naturally we started playing together.

Now, I can’t speak for my playmates at the time, but if memory serves my five-year-old self and my friends had a blast.  Dressing each others dolls, putting the Joes in dresses and the Barbies in fatigues, making up stories; you know, as kids will do.  We laughed at GI Joe in a dress because we knew it would be funny to see our dads in a dress, same as we laughed at Barbie topless, because we all had a vague understanding that topless girls were “wrong”, and therefore hilarious!  It wasn’t until much later, after we traded northern Manitoba for northern Alberta, that I got indoctrinated into the “right” toys to play with.  I won’t go into that with much detail, but it did come about from me asking if I could buy some Barbie dresses for GI Joe…

I don’t pretend to be an expert in child development, or child psychology.  But I damn-well know about play, my friend, and I will tell you this: play does not care about a child’s gender.  Joy, imagination, problem solving, situational awareness…all the things that play can develop, none of those things require a particular set of genitalia.  I would love it, as a personal favour to me, if the toy and game companies would stop making products for boys and girls and worked on making toys for children.  I don’t expect it, because let’s face it, if you called Lego or Hasbro right now they’d be all, “Brent who?”.  But I can dream.

But I do recommend, as you gift buy this holiday season, giving some thought to the gifts you buy.  I’m not suggesting you not buy Barbies for your daughter or niece, or return the kick-ass action figures you got for your son/nephew.  But maybe slip your niece a basic Lego set, too.  Or start teaching that boy to cook with an Easybake oven (I don’t even know if they make these anymore, but you get my drift).  And if all that seems a bit much, I heartily recommend board- and card-games as an excellent alternative.  There are a slough of games on the market that are hours of fun, and no gender bias for miles.

Okay, that’s my two cents.  What do you think?  Do you think gender bias in games and toys is a big deal, or the latest windmill to be tilted?  Comments are just below, and I’d really love a discussion on this.

And putting my writing where my mouth is, on Monday I’ll suggest a variety of games, toys and books that I think will make awesome gifts.  See you then!